No matter where you work or what you do, coding is a crucial part of modern day life. At present, it’s one of the most in-demand skills in the world. Not just in the technology industry, but across all industries, and that isn’t about to change any time soon! But the economy is just one […]

No matter where you work or what you do, coding is a crucial part of modern day life. At present, it’s one of the most in-demand skills in the world. Not just in the technology industry, but across all industries, and that isn’t about to change any time soon!

But the economy is just one of the many reasons the world needs coders. In celebration of Earth Day, let’s take a look at 3 ways coding helps the environment:

The internet 

Think back to April 2020 when the world first went into lockdown. Thanks to the internet and various online programs, many of us were given the opportunity to work from home. The world went quiet, the streets were empty and all meetings were held online in our favourite pyjama suits.

This much-needed healing period not only reduced air pollution, fuel consumption and paper production, but also encouraged wildlife to return to abandoned habitats. 

At a time when switching on the news was frightening, reading these stories gave us hope.

Scientific research

First of all, a huge shout out to the many scientists who dedicate their lives to saving our planet! 

Nowadays, scientists rely on technology to collect, investigate and analyse data for quicker, more accurate results.

The addition of technology to scientific research has been instrumental in learning about climate change, pollution, waste disposal and other environmental issues the world is facing today.

Wildlife corridors 

The endangerment of species and ecosystems is one of the biggest environmental issues of our time. It only takes a glance out the window to realise the world is more urbanised than ever before. 

To combat this issue, we create wildlife corridors which are essentially bridges between habitats that would otherwise be separated by human territory, e.g. roads.

Ecologists collect and analyse data on animal habits and movement patterns, then use computational methods to design wildlife corridors, creating safe passage between habitats.

When you think of coding, you may think of creating video games and computer software, but there’s no limit to the things you can do with this wonderful life skill.

Want to learn how to code and help the environment? Jam Coding offers computing workshops at primary schools across the UK. We always embed into our sessions cross-curricular references to science, climate change and other important environmental issues. Get in touch to book a workshop in your area.

ENQUIRE NOW